I thought I would draw your attention to this excellent campaign to increase awareness of the need to monitor CML treatment and the right of every patient to know their test results. The campaign is a patient driven global awareness effort, carried out in partnership with a coalition of CML-focused organisations, with the goal of optimisation of clinical outcomes for people living with CML.

www.whatismypcr.org

PCR stands for “polymerase chain reaction”. It is a diagnostic and monitoring tool used in CML to measure the response to treatment. It is not only used in CML; PCR is also used in other conditions and is generally one of or the most sensitive ways to “detect” something; be it BCR-ABL in a person with CML, anthrax on a mailed letter, evidence of a specific virus in a person after bone marrow transplant, etc.

Every time the PCR is run the value is important, and conveniently can be compared to prior values. It often is the only test which gives someone an idea about the depth and stability of their response of treatment. A person with CML should always know their PCR level! PCR results should be explained to patients in as much depth as they can understand so they have a good sense about the response level, how this compares to where they should be, when the next test is due, and if any concern or risk has developed.

The website provides information about PCR, resources for patients, a way for organisations to partner in the campaign, and information about how to request a free “What is MY PCR?” badge.

The goals of the “What is MY PCR?” initiative are:

  1. To increase patient awareness of the importance to monitor the level of residual disease.
  2. To increase patient understanding of the milestones in CML treatment.
  3. To increase patients’ involvement in their treatment.
  4. To increase local community awareness of the needs of CML patients.

So order your badge and wear it on September 22, 2012 in honor of International CML Day and beyond!

Kris

What is my PCR campaign buttons/badges

Sample images of the What Is My PCR buttons.